Company Policies

Environmental

We are committed to providing a quality service in a manner that ensures a safe and healthy workplace for our employees and minimises our potential impact on the environment. We will operate in compliance with all relevant environmental legislation and we will strive to use pollution prevention and environmental best practices in all we do.

We will:-

  • integrate the consideration of environmental concerns and impacts into all of our decision making and activities,
  • promote environmental awareness among our employees and encourage them to work in an environmentally responsible manner,
  • train, educate and inform our employees about environmental issues that may affect their work,
  • reduce waste through re-use and recycling and by purchasing recycled, recyclable or re-furbished products and materials where these alternatives are available, economical and suitable,
  • promote efficient use of materials and resources throughout our facility including water, electricity, raw materials and other resources, particularly those that are non-renewable,
  • avoid unnecessary use of hazardous materials and products, seek substitutions when feasible, and take all reasonable steps to protect human health and the environment when such materials must be used, stored and disposed of,
  • purchase and use environmentally responsible products accordingly,
  • where required by legislation or where significant health, safety or environmental hazards exist, develop and maintain appropriate emergency and spill response programmes,
  • communicate our environmental commitment to clients, customers and the public and encourage them to support it,
  • strive to continually improve our environmental performance and minimise the social impact and damage of activities by periodically reviewing our environmental policy in light of our current and planned future activities.

Equal Opportunities

The Bay Magazine is committed to eliminating discrimination and encouraging diversity amongst our workforce. Our aim is that our workforce will be truly representative of all sections of society and each employee feels respected and able to give of their best.

 

To that end the purpose of this policy is to provide equality and fairness for all in our employment and not to discriminate on grounds of gender, marital status, race, ethnic origin, colour, nationality, national origin, disability, sexual orientation, religion or age. We oppose all forms of unlawful and unfair discrimination.
All employees, whether part-time, full-time or temporary, will be treated fairly and with respect. Selection for employment, promotion, training or any other benefit will be on the basis of aptitude and ability. All employees will be helped and encouraged to develop their full potential and the talents and resources of the workforce will be fully utilised to maximise the efficiency of the organisation.
Our commitment:
  • To create an environment in which individual differences and the contributions of all our staff are recognised and valued.
  • Every employee is entitled to a working environment that promotes dignity and respect to all. No form of intimidation, bullying or harassment will be tolerated.
  • Training, development and progression opportunities are available to all staff.
  • Equality in the workplace is good management practice and makes sound business sense.
  • We will review all our employment practices and procedures to ensure fairness.

 

Breaches of our equality policy will be regarded as misconduct and could lead to disciplinary proceedings.
  • This policy is fully supported by senior management and has been agreed with trade unions and/or employee representatives. (Insert details if appropriate).
  • The policy will be monitored and reviewed annually.

Disabled Employment Policy

The Bay Magazine aims to be a caring and an equal opportunities employer.

The employment and recruitment policies are kept under review so as to reflect this.

The introduction of the Disability Discrimination Act (1995) provides both current and potential employees with new legislative protection regarding employment rights. (Company name) recognises these rights and wishes to support people who may need special assistance.

The Act itself gives disabled people protection against discrimination in employment and introduces legislation covering the provision of goods, facilities, services and property. It also provides a number of new rights and duties regarding employment. The basic philosophy underlying the Act is that a disabled person should not be treated less favourably, on account of their disability, than others who do not have the disability.

The majority of disabled people are as effective as able-bodied people and will need no additional help in settling into work and developing their employment potential. However, for those who need assistance (Company name) will provide support.

THE BAY MAGAZINE IS COMMITTED TO EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES IN EMPLOYMENT. WITHIN THE CONSTRAINTS OF LEGITIMATE JOB REQUIREMENTS IT WILL TREAT APPLICATIONS FROM DISABLED PEOPLE IN THE SAME WAY AS THOSE FROM PERSONS WITHOUT A DISABILITY. 

THE BAY MAGAZINE WILL PROVIDE ALL FEASIBLE SUPPORT FOR DISABLED EMPLOYEES WITHIN (Company name), WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF EXTERNAL AGENCIES WHERE APPROPRIATE, TO ENABLE THEM TO WORK TO MAXIMUM EFFECT WITHIN ANY LIMITS IMPOSED BY THEIR DISABILITY. 
DISABILITY DISCRIMINATION ACT (1995) – A SUMMARY 
Meaning of Disability 
For the purposes of the Act a person has a disability if he or she has ‘a physical or mental impairment which has a substantial and long-term effect on his or her ability to carry out normal day to day activities.’ Long-term has been defined as more than 12 months. The definition of “normal day to day activities” includes mobility, manual dexterity, lifting, hearing, sight, speech, memory and the ability to concentrate, learn or understand.
Employers’ Duty not to Discriminate 
Employers must not discriminate against a disabled person in relation to “the arrangements made for determining to whom the job should be offered”. The broad term ‘arrangements’ has deliberately been used to cover anything done as part of the recruitment process including application form, interviews and arrangement for selection, opportunities for training or promotion, conditions of employment, treatment at work, or dismissal.
Employers’ Duty to make Adjustments 
There is a statutory duty on employers to make reasonable adjustments to working practices and the working environment to overcome practical barriers to a disabled person. This does not mean that adjustments have to be made to cover all circumstances but there is a duty to consider adjustments in relation to an individual employee or job applicant.
Where working arrangements or physical features place the disabled person concerned at a substantial disadvantage then there is a duty to take such steps as are reasonable to prevent the arrangements or feature having that effect. Reasonableness includes balancing the cost of the adjustment and the disruption it would cause against the benefits of making it, the resources of the organisation and the availability of any financial assistance.
Examples of the steps expected may include:
  • making adjustments to premises
  • allocating some duties to another person
  • transferring the existing employee who becomes disabled to a more suitable post
  • altering working hours
  • assigning the person to a different workplace
  • allowing the individual to be absent for rehabilitation, assessment and treatment giving or arranging training
  • acquiring or modifying equipment
  • modifying instruction reference manuals
  • modifying procedures for testing and assessment
  • providing a reader or interpreter and providing supervision.
Meaning of Discrimination 
Discrimination will have occurred if:
For a reason which relates to the disabled person’s disability, the person is treated less favourably than others to whom that reason does not or would not apply; and the treatment cannot be justified. The complainant will have to show less favourable treatment, and where an employer has failed without justification to comply with any duty to make reasonable adjustments the employer will be deemed to have discriminated. This includes both current employees and potential employees.
Complaints Procedure 
As with the Sex Discrimination and Race Relations Acts the Disability Discrimination Act will protect not only current employees but job applicants as well. Any disabled job applicants or employees who think they have suffered discrimination will be able to complain to an Industrial Tribunal which may award compensation, with no upper limit, and/or recommend the employer to take action to reduce or remove the complained of discrimination.